A tested, proven way to attract more sales leads

By: Jim Connolly | June 27th, 2014 | Comments Off

Today, I want to help you attract more high quality sales leads and referrals, with a tested and proven idea.

I need to start by asking you an important question: How easy is it for people to describe what makes your service special? Read the rest of this article »



How To Sell Like The Hawaiian Beach Boys

By: Rohit Bhargava | June 6th, 2014 | Comments Off

There is an original Hawaiian Beach Boy and his name is Ted.

Every day at the Waikiki Beach Boys surf shop on the beach in Oahu, Ted teaches tourists how to surf and sometimes shares a story about the legendary Pink Palace hotel on the beach. Or tells visitors how he first purchased the name of the iconic business all the way back in 1977. Or jokingly complains how it’s sometimes tough to get his team of young tanned beach boys working because they focus a little too much on the beach girls. But the biggest challenge Ted faces is that there are lots of people offering surf lessons on the beach, and they all offer pretty much the same thing. Read the rest of this article »



How Many Leads Do You Need to Generate? Use This Simple Calculator.

By: Ruth Stevens | May 9th, 2014 | Comments Off

One key to successful B2B lead generation programs is to calculate exactly the right number of qualified leads to provide to sales—as part of your campaign planning.  If you generate too many leads, you’ll be wasting precious marketing dollars. If you generate too few, your firm may be at risk of missing its revenue targets, with potentially disastrous financial implications.  Moreover, you’ll annoy your sales team by not supporting them properly. So, let’s look at a neat way to figure out in advance how many leads your company needs, so you can invest accordingly. 

This easy method uses your sales people’s quotas to back your way into the number of leads required, based on sales productivity per lead.  You will need four numbers:

  1. The average revenue quota per rep, in the period, whether it’s a year, or a quarter, or a month.
  2. The average revenue per order, or per closed deal.
  3. The percent of their quota that the sales people generate naturally, without the help of leads.  This revenue typically flows from repeat sales, from deeper penetration within the accounts, or from referrals.
  4. The conversion rate from qualified lead to sales.

The first three numbers are likely to come from a discussion with sales management, and your finance department.  The last number you probably have on hand, from sales and marketing experience.

Revenue quota per rep $3,000,000
Percentage of quota self-generated 40%
Quota requiring lead support: $3M*(1-.4) $1,800,000
Revenue per order $60,000
Converting leads required ($1.8M/$60K) 30
Conversion rate 20%
Qualified leads required per rep (30/.2) 150

Here’s an example of how to do this calculation, based on a set of hypothetical numbers that might be common in large-enterprise selling environments.  We are saying that each rep is on the hook to deliver $3 million in sales in the period.  As a first calculation, subtract out the percentage of that revenue that the rep can produce without any leads supplied by marketing.  In this example, it’s 40% self-generated, leaving 60%, or $1.8 million, that the rep needs help with from marketing.

We divide that remaining revenue by the average deal size, which is $60,000 in this example, to get the number of closed deals that each rep, on average, needs to complete to deliver on the revenue quota.  In this example, it’s 30 deals.

Finally, we divide the number of deals required by the lead-to-sales conversion rate, which is 20% in this example.  Voila.  Now we know that each reps needs, on average, 150 qualified leads to make quota.

You can also take this to the next step, and calculate the campaign inquiries required by dividing the 150 leads by your inquiry-to-lead conversion rate.  With that, you can plan your campaigns to generate enough inquiries for your pipeline that will convert to a known number of qualified leads, and thereafter to the needed revenue.

So, with this simple math exercise, you can avoid waste and keep your sales reps as productive as they can be.  Do you use another method that you can share?

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Why Conversion is More Important Than Traffic

By: Sally Ormond | April 18th, 2014 | Comments Off

My office faces one of the busiest roads in Suffolk. Traffic constantly roars back and forth as people make their way between Suffolk and Norfolk.

Drinking my coffee this morning, wracking my brain for an idea to write about, it suddenly struck me. Traffic.

You, and every other online business, is obsessed by traffic.

Religiously, day in day out, you’re checking your analytics to see how many visitors your website is getting and where they are coming from.

You smile smugly as you see your visitor numbers increase; you are invincible because you are brining in 10 times the traffic of your competitors.

So what?

If you’re that amazing, why are your competitors making more money than you?

What’s happening to your traffic?

Running a business is tough. There’s so much to think about and only a finite amount of money to reinvest.

You probably started out with an ‘OK’ website that you got cheap and filled with content yourself. With a bit of help from your SEO guy (or girl) you’ve got traffic heading your way in droves, but something strange is happening.

When you look at your sales (i.e. conversions), they aren’t reflective of the number of visitors you’re getting.

Why?

Because your website and its content isn’t up to scratch.

Look at it this way, if you have a High Street store with a stunning window display, potential customers will flock through your doors. When they get inside, if your products are haphazardly strewn here and there and your sales team are loitering in corners discussing what they’re going to be doing at the weekend, ignoring them, the chances are they’ll turn round and find a different shop that’s more welcoming.

Well, that’s what’s going on with your website.

Your SEO guy/girl has done an amazing job luring people to your website, but because you’ve got a dreary site with awful content, they’re leaving straightaway.

Yes, SEO is important to get people to your website, but it’s the design and, more importantly, the content that will get them to stay and buy.

Convincing people to stay and buy

Your website copywriting must:

  • Address the reader directly
  • Sell the benefits of your products and services
  • Convince them to buy

One of the most common mistakes is to write about your company. This comes across as very inward facing and ignores the needs of your customers.

When they reach your website they want to instantly see what it is you offer, how it will help them and why they should buy it.

If you write in the second person (i.e. using ‘you’ instead of ‘we’ – just like this blog post) you are instantly creating a relationship with the reader. It’s as if you are talking to them – it’s the written equivalent of eye contact.

Using this technique, show them the benefits of your product. That doesn’t mean the colour, size, technical spec etc., all that comes later in the product description. They will want to know how it will make their life easier.

SEO and content go hand in hand

If you want to succeed online, you must invest in good search engine optimisation and great web content.

Find a copywriter who really understands the concept of search marketing and who can create content that fulfils the needs of both Google and your customers. It’s a fine line to tread, but one that will bring incredible results when done well.

A good SEO and copywriter is a dream team – when you find yours hold on to them and don’t let them go.

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Attract, Engage & Convert More Customers

By: Lee Odden | March 28th, 2014 | Comment Now »

Outside of marketing and customer service, one of the fastest growing areas in the social media world is social selling. With billions of people connected to social networks for personal and business reasons, time and attention of prospects is both valuable and highly competitive.
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